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Internal Communication Group Teaching Presentation

December 7th, 2012 by under Uncategorized. No Comments.

This group teaching presentation involves teaching the rest of the class a course-related topic using creative approaches, in addition to designing a class activity and quiz. I had the pleasure of working with my esteemed colleagues that brought a wealth of expertise to this project. It was one of the very few times that I was assigned to a team instead of forming my own, which I thought was a great idea. One of the things that I always wanted to do more of was to work with different people in the program, venture out of your comfort zone (meaning your best friends and best bets), you will be pleasantly surprised.

So who looks after the internal communication function in an organization? It has long been the battle between PR and HR. HR folks know the employees very well and have insight into how internal communication relates to overall company strategies and goals. On the other hand, PR people have a keen sense of newsworthiness and know which channels are most effective, they are skilled in taking key messages and dressing them into exciting communication that are often well received.

Aside from the presentation that was meant to be informative, we had a journalist on our team and he wrote up nine outlandish stories (3 of which are based on facts or news) for our class activity that mimicked the NPR show ‘Wait wait, don’t tell me’. The biggest take-away from this project is that I realize how much effort and time professors need to put into a lecture before they come to class. Standing in front of a classroom of students and regurgitating the knowledge you have in interesting and meaningful words is hard, at one hour fifty minutes, most definitely.

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Multicultural and Multigenerational Communication

December 7th, 2012 by under Uncategorized. No Comments.

After sitting through a lecture delivered by my classmates on ‘Multicultural and Multigenerational Communication’, it really helped bridge my understanding and awareness of how to communicate to distinct groups and to never underestimate the adverse effect of poor and inappropriate communication for different audiences. Being Asian-American, I often don’t catch on to mainstream pop-culture and wonder what the underlying meaning of unfamiliar idioms is when people make mention of it. It reminded me of how difficult it must be for internationals when they study abroad, or when people conduct meetings overseas. Having been exposed to many cultures, I still cannot fully grasp the complexity and entirety of cultural implications that influences communication at that level.  

The multigenerational age groups were divided into four segments, respectively: Traditionals, Boomers, Gen X and Gen Y. Learning that Traditionals preferred face-to-face communication, and that email and text would appeal most to the Gen Yers was very interesting. As someone that falls into the Gen X category, I have a strong inclination towards face-to-face communication, although I see value in the convenience, timeliness and how it could serve as a record of dialogue. Whenever possible, I would still go for in-person meetings and discussions. I have also worked with Traditionals that avoided face-to-face communication and asked to be called. Generally, I would agree that it is best to follow the implied protocols unless otherwise told.

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20-20 Presentation

December 7th, 2012 by under Uncategorized. No Comments.

I had long been looking forward to this particular format of presentation when I saw it on the syllabus first day of class. As luck would have it, I was still scrambling for ideas 3 days before my presentation because I changed my topic twice, hoping that I could come up with something really original- the winning contestant was plastic surgery. Given my extensive research on this topic in earlier years when I fantasized about becoming Miss Universe (no, not really.), I felt that this was something I was very comfortable sharing with my classmates. On the day of, my dry runs averaged just under 7 minutes, slightly over the 6 minutes 40 second requirement. When I actually got in front of my classmates and started talking, I didn’t stray from my key messages, but definitely elaborated more than I should have, which brought my presentation up to 10 minutes. We have very different perceptions of ourselves and what is in fact portrayed to others, when we don’t receive the intended reaction that we so surely expect when we rehearsed it in our head, it tends to throw people off. I was aiming for informational and entertaining, but most of my classmates felt that it was serious and personal (to me of course).

I was really impressed with my classmates’ 20-20 presentations; we had topics ranging from peanut butter to government financing.

A few tips for those of you that get the opportunity to do this-
1. Don’t over think it. Deciding the topic is important, but delivery is crucial and that’s what makes or breaks your performance. If you can “wow” your audience with a mundane or difficult topic, you pretty much have it.
2. Set the PowerPoint to advance to the next slide at 20 seconds. Even if you practice ahead of time, you lose track of time when you start unless you have your presentation memorized word for word…which also defeats the purpose of doing the 20-20 presentation. 
3. Enjoy it, pick a topic, do your research on it, or choose something that you’re familiar with, and pick your brains out to produce the best possible presentation.

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